CHINANTLA TORTILLERIA
by: Mitchell Kuga
photos: farika
There’s a cornfield in Bushwick, on an industrial strip of Grand Street, painted on the facade of Tortilleria Chinantla. The mural is lush with shades of green stalks of corn backing roaming cows and tanned farmers. Rendered in three-dimensional detail by artist Jamie Kosse, the facade offers a calm relief amongst the forest of auto shops and delivery trucks.The smell of hot corn tortillas popping off the line wafts onto the street. The mural pays tribute to Chinantla, a Mexican municipality in Puebla where Erasmo Ponce, the cofounder of the factory, is from. A depiction of a young Ponce can be found in the smiling face of one of the farmers, holding a box full of overflowing corn. “It still looks like him,” says Jocelyn Ponce, Erasmo’s daughter.
            Inside, Jocelyn takes us on a tour of the factory, a sprawling, 4,500 square foot space with large, steely equipment that mirrors the industrialism outside. Steam rises off the tortillas as they catapult out of an oven heated at 800 degrees Fahrenheit.  The discs snake down eight tiers of conveyor belts (the cooling down process) before being stacked, packed, and boxed by three workers waiting at the end of the line. The entire process happens with a blurry efficiency.
            It’s the pace required to fulfill a hungry demand. Aside from providing the tortillas for Trophy Bar’s Taco Tuesdays and the chips for its nachos, Tortilleria Chinantla also supplies tortillas at Associated and Key Foods, in addition to making home deliveries in the area. With a few clicks of the calculator, Jocelyn estimates the factory produces 259,000 tortillas a day.
[[MORE]]
            Erasmo founded the factory 22 years ago, a year after Jocelyn was born. It’s tuned into a successful family business, with Jocelyn and her two brothers helping out a few days a week. Jocelyn speaks proudly about the business that her father, an architect in Mexico who worked as a truck driver during his first few years in America, built from the ground up. Using the highest grade of Maseca corn flour, the tortillas are certified kosher. The business is also part of the Pride of New York program, a division of The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.
            On our way out, Jocelyn hands us freshly packed tortillas. “Thank you for coming,” she says, as she walks us towards the cornfield. It’s cold out, but the tortillas, soft and fragrant, are still warm.


Taco Tuesdays take place starting May 13th and every Tuesday at Trophy Bar.
ZoomInfo
CHINANTLA TORTILLERIA
by: Mitchell Kuga
photos: farika
There’s a cornfield in Bushwick, on an industrial strip of Grand Street, painted on the facade of Tortilleria Chinantla. The mural is lush with shades of green stalks of corn backing roaming cows and tanned farmers. Rendered in three-dimensional detail by artist Jamie Kosse, the facade offers a calm relief amongst the forest of auto shops and delivery trucks.The smell of hot corn tortillas popping off the line wafts onto the street. The mural pays tribute to Chinantla, a Mexican municipality in Puebla where Erasmo Ponce, the cofounder of the factory, is from. A depiction of a young Ponce can be found in the smiling face of one of the farmers, holding a box full of overflowing corn. “It still looks like him,” says Jocelyn Ponce, Erasmo’s daughter.
            Inside, Jocelyn takes us on a tour of the factory, a sprawling, 4,500 square foot space with large, steely equipment that mirrors the industrialism outside. Steam rises off the tortillas as they catapult out of an oven heated at 800 degrees Fahrenheit.  The discs snake down eight tiers of conveyor belts (the cooling down process) before being stacked, packed, and boxed by three workers waiting at the end of the line. The entire process happens with a blurry efficiency.
            It’s the pace required to fulfill a hungry demand. Aside from providing the tortillas for Trophy Bar’s Taco Tuesdays and the chips for its nachos, Tortilleria Chinantla also supplies tortillas at Associated and Key Foods, in addition to making home deliveries in the area. With a few clicks of the calculator, Jocelyn estimates the factory produces 259,000 tortillas a day.
[[MORE]]
            Erasmo founded the factory 22 years ago, a year after Jocelyn was born. It’s tuned into a successful family business, with Jocelyn and her two brothers helping out a few days a week. Jocelyn speaks proudly about the business that her father, an architect in Mexico who worked as a truck driver during his first few years in America, built from the ground up. Using the highest grade of Maseca corn flour, the tortillas are certified kosher. The business is also part of the Pride of New York program, a division of The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.
            On our way out, Jocelyn hands us freshly packed tortillas. “Thank you for coming,” she says, as she walks us towards the cornfield. It’s cold out, but the tortillas, soft and fragrant, are still warm.


Taco Tuesdays take place starting May 13th and every Tuesday at Trophy Bar.
ZoomInfo
CHINANTLA TORTILLERIA
by: Mitchell Kuga
photos: farika
There’s a cornfield in Bushwick, on an industrial strip of Grand Street, painted on the facade of Tortilleria Chinantla. The mural is lush with shades of green stalks of corn backing roaming cows and tanned farmers. Rendered in three-dimensional detail by artist Jamie Kosse, the facade offers a calm relief amongst the forest of auto shops and delivery trucks.The smell of hot corn tortillas popping off the line wafts onto the street. The mural pays tribute to Chinantla, a Mexican municipality in Puebla where Erasmo Ponce, the cofounder of the factory, is from. A depiction of a young Ponce can be found in the smiling face of one of the farmers, holding a box full of overflowing corn. “It still looks like him,” says Jocelyn Ponce, Erasmo’s daughter.
            Inside, Jocelyn takes us on a tour of the factory, a sprawling, 4,500 square foot space with large, steely equipment that mirrors the industrialism outside. Steam rises off the tortillas as they catapult out of an oven heated at 800 degrees Fahrenheit.  The discs snake down eight tiers of conveyor belts (the cooling down process) before being stacked, packed, and boxed by three workers waiting at the end of the line. The entire process happens with a blurry efficiency.
            It’s the pace required to fulfill a hungry demand. Aside from providing the tortillas for Trophy Bar’s Taco Tuesdays and the chips for its nachos, Tortilleria Chinantla also supplies tortillas at Associated and Key Foods, in addition to making home deliveries in the area. With a few clicks of the calculator, Jocelyn estimates the factory produces 259,000 tortillas a day.
[[MORE]]
            Erasmo founded the factory 22 years ago, a year after Jocelyn was born. It’s tuned into a successful family business, with Jocelyn and her two brothers helping out a few days a week. Jocelyn speaks proudly about the business that her father, an architect in Mexico who worked as a truck driver during his first few years in America, built from the ground up. Using the highest grade of Maseca corn flour, the tortillas are certified kosher. The business is also part of the Pride of New York program, a division of The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.
            On our way out, Jocelyn hands us freshly packed tortillas. “Thank you for coming,” she says, as she walks us towards the cornfield. It’s cold out, but the tortillas, soft and fragrant, are still warm.


Taco Tuesdays take place starting May 13th and every Tuesday at Trophy Bar.
ZoomInfo
CHINANTLA TORTILLERIA
by: Mitchell Kuga
photos: farika
There’s a cornfield in Bushwick, on an industrial strip of Grand Street, painted on the facade of Tortilleria Chinantla. The mural is lush with shades of green stalks of corn backing roaming cows and tanned farmers. Rendered in three-dimensional detail by artist Jamie Kosse, the facade offers a calm relief amongst the forest of auto shops and delivery trucks.The smell of hot corn tortillas popping off the line wafts onto the street. The mural pays tribute to Chinantla, a Mexican municipality in Puebla where Erasmo Ponce, the cofounder of the factory, is from. A depiction of a young Ponce can be found in the smiling face of one of the farmers, holding a box full of overflowing corn. “It still looks like him,” says Jocelyn Ponce, Erasmo’s daughter.
            Inside, Jocelyn takes us on a tour of the factory, a sprawling, 4,500 square foot space with large, steely equipment that mirrors the industrialism outside. Steam rises off the tortillas as they catapult out of an oven heated at 800 degrees Fahrenheit.  The discs snake down eight tiers of conveyor belts (the cooling down process) before being stacked, packed, and boxed by three workers waiting at the end of the line. The entire process happens with a blurry efficiency.
            It’s the pace required to fulfill a hungry demand. Aside from providing the tortillas for Trophy Bar’s Taco Tuesdays and the chips for its nachos, Tortilleria Chinantla also supplies tortillas at Associated and Key Foods, in addition to making home deliveries in the area. With a few clicks of the calculator, Jocelyn estimates the factory produces 259,000 tortillas a day.
[[MORE]]
            Erasmo founded the factory 22 years ago, a year after Jocelyn was born. It’s tuned into a successful family business, with Jocelyn and her two brothers helping out a few days a week. Jocelyn speaks proudly about the business that her father, an architect in Mexico who worked as a truck driver during his first few years in America, built from the ground up. Using the highest grade of Maseca corn flour, the tortillas are certified kosher. The business is also part of the Pride of New York program, a division of The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.
            On our way out, Jocelyn hands us freshly packed tortillas. “Thank you for coming,” she says, as she walks us towards the cornfield. It’s cold out, but the tortillas, soft and fragrant, are still warm.


Taco Tuesdays take place starting May 13th and every Tuesday at Trophy Bar.
ZoomInfo
CHINANTLA TORTILLERIA
by: Mitchell Kuga
photos: farika
There’s a cornfield in Bushwick, on an industrial strip of Grand Street, painted on the facade of Tortilleria Chinantla. The mural is lush with shades of green stalks of corn backing roaming cows and tanned farmers. Rendered in three-dimensional detail by artist Jamie Kosse, the facade offers a calm relief amongst the forest of auto shops and delivery trucks.The smell of hot corn tortillas popping off the line wafts onto the street. The mural pays tribute to Chinantla, a Mexican municipality in Puebla where Erasmo Ponce, the cofounder of the factory, is from. A depiction of a young Ponce can be found in the smiling face of one of the farmers, holding a box full of overflowing corn. “It still looks like him,” says Jocelyn Ponce, Erasmo’s daughter.
            Inside, Jocelyn takes us on a tour of the factory, a sprawling, 4,500 square foot space with large, steely equipment that mirrors the industrialism outside. Steam rises off the tortillas as they catapult out of an oven heated at 800 degrees Fahrenheit.  The discs snake down eight tiers of conveyor belts (the cooling down process) before being stacked, packed, and boxed by three workers waiting at the end of the line. The entire process happens with a blurry efficiency.
            It’s the pace required to fulfill a hungry demand. Aside from providing the tortillas for Trophy Bar’s Taco Tuesdays and the chips for its nachos, Tortilleria Chinantla also supplies tortillas at Associated and Key Foods, in addition to making home deliveries in the area. With a few clicks of the calculator, Jocelyn estimates the factory produces 259,000 tortillas a day.
[[MORE]]
            Erasmo founded the factory 22 years ago, a year after Jocelyn was born. It’s tuned into a successful family business, with Jocelyn and her two brothers helping out a few days a week. Jocelyn speaks proudly about the business that her father, an architect in Mexico who worked as a truck driver during his first few years in America, built from the ground up. Using the highest grade of Maseca corn flour, the tortillas are certified kosher. The business is also part of the Pride of New York program, a division of The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.
            On our way out, Jocelyn hands us freshly packed tortillas. “Thank you for coming,” she says, as she walks us towards the cornfield. It’s cold out, but the tortillas, soft and fragrant, are still warm.


Taco Tuesdays take place starting May 13th and every Tuesday at Trophy Bar.
ZoomInfo
CHINANTLA TORTILLERIA
by: Mitchell Kuga
photos: farika
There’s a cornfield in Bushwick, on an industrial strip of Grand Street, painted on the facade of Tortilleria Chinantla. The mural is lush with shades of green stalks of corn backing roaming cows and tanned farmers. Rendered in three-dimensional detail by artist Jamie Kosse, the facade offers a calm relief amongst the forest of auto shops and delivery trucks.The smell of hot corn tortillas popping off the line wafts onto the street. The mural pays tribute to Chinantla, a Mexican municipality in Puebla where Erasmo Ponce, the cofounder of the factory, is from. A depiction of a young Ponce can be found in the smiling face of one of the farmers, holding a box full of overflowing corn. “It still looks like him,” says Jocelyn Ponce, Erasmo’s daughter.
            Inside, Jocelyn takes us on a tour of the factory, a sprawling, 4,500 square foot space with large, steely equipment that mirrors the industrialism outside. Steam rises off the tortillas as they catapult out of an oven heated at 800 degrees Fahrenheit.  The discs snake down eight tiers of conveyor belts (the cooling down process) before being stacked, packed, and boxed by three workers waiting at the end of the line. The entire process happens with a blurry efficiency.
            It’s the pace required to fulfill a hungry demand. Aside from providing the tortillas for Trophy Bar’s Taco Tuesdays and the chips for its nachos, Tortilleria Chinantla also supplies tortillas at Associated and Key Foods, in addition to making home deliveries in the area. With a few clicks of the calculator, Jocelyn estimates the factory produces 259,000 tortillas a day.
[[MORE]]
            Erasmo founded the factory 22 years ago, a year after Jocelyn was born. It’s tuned into a successful family business, with Jocelyn and her two brothers helping out a few days a week. Jocelyn speaks proudly about the business that her father, an architect in Mexico who worked as a truck driver during his first few years in America, built from the ground up. Using the highest grade of Maseca corn flour, the tortillas are certified kosher. The business is also part of the Pride of New York program, a division of The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.
            On our way out, Jocelyn hands us freshly packed tortillas. “Thank you for coming,” she says, as she walks us towards the cornfield. It’s cold out, but the tortillas, soft and fragrant, are still warm.


Taco Tuesdays take place starting May 13th and every Tuesday at Trophy Bar.
ZoomInfo
CHINANTLA TORTILLERIA
by: Mitchell Kuga
photos: farika
There’s a cornfield in Bushwick, on an industrial strip of Grand Street, painted on the facade of Tortilleria Chinantla. The mural is lush with shades of green stalks of corn backing roaming cows and tanned farmers. Rendered in three-dimensional detail by artist Jamie Kosse, the facade offers a calm relief amongst the forest of auto shops and delivery trucks.The smell of hot corn tortillas popping off the line wafts onto the street. The mural pays tribute to Chinantla, a Mexican municipality in Puebla where Erasmo Ponce, the cofounder of the factory, is from. A depiction of a young Ponce can be found in the smiling face of one of the farmers, holding a box full of overflowing corn. “It still looks like him,” says Jocelyn Ponce, Erasmo’s daughter.
            Inside, Jocelyn takes us on a tour of the factory, a sprawling, 4,500 square foot space with large, steely equipment that mirrors the industrialism outside. Steam rises off the tortillas as they catapult out of an oven heated at 800 degrees Fahrenheit.  The discs snake down eight tiers of conveyor belts (the cooling down process) before being stacked, packed, and boxed by three workers waiting at the end of the line. The entire process happens with a blurry efficiency.
            It’s the pace required to fulfill a hungry demand. Aside from providing the tortillas for Trophy Bar’s Taco Tuesdays and the chips for its nachos, Tortilleria Chinantla also supplies tortillas at Associated and Key Foods, in addition to making home deliveries in the area. With a few clicks of the calculator, Jocelyn estimates the factory produces 259,000 tortillas a day.
[[MORE]]
            Erasmo founded the factory 22 years ago, a year after Jocelyn was born. It’s tuned into a successful family business, with Jocelyn and her two brothers helping out a few days a week. Jocelyn speaks proudly about the business that her father, an architect in Mexico who worked as a truck driver during his first few years in America, built from the ground up. Using the highest grade of Maseca corn flour, the tortillas are certified kosher. The business is also part of the Pride of New York program, a division of The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.
            On our way out, Jocelyn hands us freshly packed tortillas. “Thank you for coming,” she says, as she walks us towards the cornfield. It’s cold out, but the tortillas, soft and fragrant, are still warm.


Taco Tuesdays take place starting May 13th and every Tuesday at Trophy Bar.
ZoomInfo
CHINANTLA TORTILLERIA
by: Mitchell Kuga
photos: farika
There’s a cornfield in Bushwick, on an industrial strip of Grand Street, painted on the facade of Tortilleria Chinantla. The mural is lush with shades of green stalks of corn backing roaming cows and tanned farmers. Rendered in three-dimensional detail by artist Jamie Kosse, the facade offers a calm relief amongst the forest of auto shops and delivery trucks.The smell of hot corn tortillas popping off the line wafts onto the street. The mural pays tribute to Chinantla, a Mexican municipality in Puebla where Erasmo Ponce, the cofounder of the factory, is from. A depiction of a young Ponce can be found in the smiling face of one of the farmers, holding a box full of overflowing corn. “It still looks like him,” says Jocelyn Ponce, Erasmo’s daughter.
            Inside, Jocelyn takes us on a tour of the factory, a sprawling, 4,500 square foot space with large, steely equipment that mirrors the industrialism outside. Steam rises off the tortillas as they catapult out of an oven heated at 800 degrees Fahrenheit.  The discs snake down eight tiers of conveyor belts (the cooling down process) before being stacked, packed, and boxed by three workers waiting at the end of the line. The entire process happens with a blurry efficiency.
            It’s the pace required to fulfill a hungry demand. Aside from providing the tortillas for Trophy Bar’s Taco Tuesdays and the chips for its nachos, Tortilleria Chinantla also supplies tortillas at Associated and Key Foods, in addition to making home deliveries in the area. With a few clicks of the calculator, Jocelyn estimates the factory produces 259,000 tortillas a day.
[[MORE]]
            Erasmo founded the factory 22 years ago, a year after Jocelyn was born. It’s tuned into a successful family business, with Jocelyn and her two brothers helping out a few days a week. Jocelyn speaks proudly about the business that her father, an architect in Mexico who worked as a truck driver during his first few years in America, built from the ground up. Using the highest grade of Maseca corn flour, the tortillas are certified kosher. The business is also part of the Pride of New York program, a division of The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.
            On our way out, Jocelyn hands us freshly packed tortillas. “Thank you for coming,” she says, as she walks us towards the cornfield. It’s cold out, but the tortillas, soft and fragrant, are still warm.


Taco Tuesdays take place starting May 13th and every Tuesday at Trophy Bar.
ZoomInfo

CHINANTLA TORTILLERIA

by: Mitchell Kuga

photos: farika

Theres a cornfield in Bushwick, on an industrial strip of Grand Street, painted on the facade of Tortilleria Chinantla. The mural is lush with shades of green stalks of corn backing roaming cows and tanned farmers. Rendered in three-dimensional detail by artist Jamie Kosse, the facade offers a calm relief amongst the forest of auto shops and delivery trucks.The smell of hot corn tortillas popping off the line wafts onto the street. The mural pays tribute to Chinantla, a Mexican municipality in Puebla where Erasmo Ponce, the cofounder of the factory, is from. A depiction of a young Ponce can be found in the smiling face of one of the farmers, holding a box full of overflowing corn. It still looks like him, says Jocelyn Ponce, Erasmos daughter.

            Inside, Jocelyn takes us on a tour of the factory, a sprawling, 4,500 square foot space with large, steely equipment that mirrors the industrialism outside. Steam rises off the tortillas as they catapult out of an oven heated at 800 degrees Fahrenheit.  The discs snake down eight tiers of conveyor belts (the cooling down process) before being stacked, packed, and boxed by three workers waiting at the end of the line. The entire process happens with a blurry efficiency.

            Its the pace required to fulfill a hungry demand. Aside from providing the tortillas for Trophy Bars Taco Tuesdays and the chips for its nachos, Tortilleria Chinantla also supplies tortillas at Associated and Key Foods, in addition to making home deliveries in the area. With a few clicks of the calculator, Jocelyn estimates the factory produces 259,000 tortillas a day.

Read More

"DIVISION BELL"

by: Ian Hassett

photo: farika

The true signature of a quality cocktail is balance. Though the list of ingredients may include syrup-sweet or bitterest of bitters, the real enjoyment of a well-made drink is the harmony of ingredients to create a complex yet discernible palate. The Division Bell, from Mayahuel’s Philip Ward, is such a cocktail.

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COCKTAIL OF THE MONTH
The “Paper Plane”
Originally created by Sam Ross of Milk and Honey in 2008 and named after singer M.I.A’s song “Paper Planes”

The Paper Plane is a bright and refreshing bourbon citrus cocktail made with 2 different Italian bitters. We love our Italian bitters around here! It consists of equal parts of bourbon, Amaro Nonino, Aperol and lemon juice. An easy to remember recipe and perfect balance of bitter and sweet!  You’ll fly like paper and get high like planes.
ZoomInfo

COCKTAIL OF THE MONTH

The “Paper Plane”

Originally created by Sam Ross of Milk and Honey in 2008 and named after singer M.I.A’s song “Paper Planes”

The Paper Plane is a bright and refreshing bourbon citrus cocktail made with 2 different Italian bitters. We love our Italian bitters around here! It consists of equal parts of bourbon, Amaro Nonino, Aperol and lemon juice. An easy to remember recipe and perfect balance of bitter and sweet!  You’ll fly like paper and get high like planes.

"THE FRIDA"
by: Ian Hassett
photo: farika
Borne out of frustration with polar vortexes and a desire for warmer weather, The Frida consists of Cazadores Blanco tequila, freshly squeezed lime juice, and sweet agave nectar. However it’s the addition of muddled cucumber and jalepeños that makes The Frida a truly refreshing take on the classic margarita. Our latest addition takes its name from one of our favorite Mexican artists (Frida Kahlo), and is slightly sweet, with heat on the nose and a citrus-cucumber base. Let The Frida transport you to warmer weather and happier times.
ZoomInfo

"THE FRIDA"

by: Ian Hassett

photo: farika

Borne out of frustration with polar vortexes and a desire for warmer weather, The Frida consists of Cazadores Blanco tequila, freshly squeezed lime juice, and sweet agave nectar. However it’s the addition of muddled cucumber and jalepeños that makes The Frida a truly refreshing take on the classic margarita. Our latest addition takes its name from one of our favorite Mexican artists (Frida Kahlo), and is slightly sweet, with heat on the nose and a citrus-cucumber base. Let The Frida transport you to warmer weather and happier times.